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FOR ATHLETES

Two questions for every training session

Via Michael Gervais, here are the two most important things to ask yourself after every single practice:

1 – What went well?

2 -What do I want to work on?

Always acknowledge a victory, no matter how small. Always recognize opportunities for improvements rather than the errors themselves.

The specific language is SUPER important here, and I’d encourage you to listen to Gervais’ full explanation in this Brute Strength Podcast interview below.

On the web: https://brutestrengthtraining.com/podcast/performance-psychology-mindfulness-self-mastery-ft-michael-gervais

On iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/brute-strength-podcast/id986759513?mt=2&i=374146116

My back squat mind ninja trick

Just finished a 1RM testing cycle on a bunch of my lifts. It reminded me of this thing I do on squats.

Pro tip: Always unrack the weight with as much strength and speed as possible.

Feeling that bar “fly” out of the rack gives me a good radar on how the very next rep is gonna go.

If your bar can’t explode out of the J hooks, you might be trying something that is out of your capabilities.

If it can, you should mentally note that let it feed the squat that’s about to happen.

This isn’t a science, just something that I have found to be extremely useful for myself. If you think it’s dumb or find that it doesn’t work for you, don’t use it.

Either way, just remember that confidence is everything. Do whatever you need to get your mind right and stick with it.

Even when I know I’m tricking myself on purpose, it still works.

Perseverance and passion matter more than IQ and talent

Closing statements from a study on grit:

In a qualitative study of the development of world-class pianists,
neurologists, swimmers, chess players, mathematicians, and sculptors,
Bloom (1985) noted that “only a few of [the 120 talented
individuals in the sample] were regarded as prodigies by teachers,
parents, or experts” (p. 533). Rather, accomplished individuals
worked day after day, for at least 10 or 15 years, to reach the top
of their fields. Bloom observed that in every studied field, the
general qualities possessed by high achievers included a strong
interest in the particular field, a desire to reach “a high level of
attainment” in that field, and a “willingness to put in great amounts
of time and effort” (p. 544). Similarly, in her study of prodigies
who later made significant contributions to their field, Winner
(1996) concluded, “Creators must be able to persist in the face of
difficulty and overcome the many obstacles in the way of creative
discovery…. Drive and energy in childhood are more predictive
of success, if not creativity, than is IQ or some other more
domain-specific ability” (p. 293).

The qualitative insights of Winner (1996), Bloom (1985), and
Galton (1892), coupled with evidence gathered by the current
investigation and its forerunners, suggest that, in every field, grit
may be as essential as talent to high accomplishment. If substantiated,
this conclusion has several practical implications: First,
children who demonstrate exceptional commitment to a particular
goal should be supported with as many resources as those identified
as “gifted and talented.” Second, as educators and parents, we
should encourage children to work not only with intensity but also
with stamina. In particular, we should prepare youth to anticipate
failures and misfortunes and point out that excellence in any
discipline requires years and years of time on task. Finally, liberal
arts universities that encourage undergraduates to sample broadly
should recognize the ineluctable trade-off between breadth and
depth. To paraphrase Benjamin Franklin, the goal of an education
is not just to learn a little about a lot but also a lot about a little.

Read the full article here. Angela Duckworth also has a phenomenal book on the topic of grit that I highly recommend.

Andrea & Friends 007 – LS McClain

To listen and subscribe on iTunes right away, CLICK HERE.

In this conversation, I’m talking to my good friend and World Champion Powerlifter, LS McClain.

LS was actually one of my coaches at cheerleading camp in college!

We didn’t meet again until the end of 2015 at the Olympia expo and have become closer and closer ever since. Especially because he is one of my boyfriend’s best friends and a part of the close-knit family we hang around with quite often.

In this particular chat, we talk about his upcoming meet at USAPL Raw Nationals, his career as a cheerleading coach at Texas State University, his YouTube channel, his clothing line (McClain & Crcl), his life as an online powerlifting coach, and a whole bunch more.— Read More…

Hard Work Will Always Be Hard Without Love

About three months ago, 19-year-old Frank Ntilikina was the 8th pick in the NBA draft. He signed with the New York Knicks to begin his third year of professional basketball after two previous seasons in French and European leagues.

As you might have guessed, this was an absolute dream come true for the teenager who was raised in France after his Rwandan family members fled their home country to escape the dangers of war.

I read about his story in an autobiographical article Frank wrote to share the best piece of advice he ever received.— Read More…

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