Browsing Tag

TRAINING

Two questions for every training session

Via Michael Gervais, here are the two most important things to ask yourself after every single practice:

1 – What went well?

2 -What do I want to work on?

Always acknowledge a victory, no matter how small. Always recognize opportunities for improvements rather than the errors themselves.

The specific language is SUPER important here, and I’d encourage you to listen to Gervais’ full explanation in this Brute Strength Podcast interview below.

On the web: https://brutestrengthtraining.com/podcast/performance-psychology-mindfulness-self-mastery-ft-michael-gervais

On iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/brute-strength-podcast/id986759513?mt=2&i=374146116

Perseverance and passion matter more than IQ and talent

Closing statements from a study on grit:

In a qualitative study of the development of world-class pianists,
neurologists, swimmers, chess players, mathematicians, and sculptors,
Bloom (1985) noted that “only a few of [the 120 talented
individuals in the sample] were regarded as prodigies by teachers,
parents, or experts” (p. 533). Rather, accomplished individuals
worked day after day, for at least 10 or 15 years, to reach the top
of their fields. Bloom observed that in every studied field, the
general qualities possessed by high achievers included a strong
interest in the particular field, a desire to reach “a high level of
attainment” in that field, and a “willingness to put in great amounts
of time and effort” (p. 544). Similarly, in her study of prodigies
who later made significant contributions to their field, Winner
(1996) concluded, “Creators must be able to persist in the face of
difficulty and overcome the many obstacles in the way of creative
discovery…. Drive and energy in childhood are more predictive
of success, if not creativity, than is IQ or some other more
domain-specific ability” (p. 293).

The qualitative insights of Winner (1996), Bloom (1985), and
Galton (1892), coupled with evidence gathered by the current
investigation and its forerunners, suggest that, in every field, grit
may be as essential as talent to high accomplishment. If substantiated,
this conclusion has several practical implications: First,
children who demonstrate exceptional commitment to a particular
goal should be supported with as many resources as those identified
as “gifted and talented.” Second, as educators and parents, we
should encourage children to work not only with intensity but also
with stamina. In particular, we should prepare youth to anticipate
failures and misfortunes and point out that excellence in any
discipline requires years and years of time on task. Finally, liberal
arts universities that encourage undergraduates to sample broadly
should recognize the ineluctable trade-off between breadth and
depth. To paraphrase Benjamin Franklin, the goal of an education
is not just to learn a little about a lot but also a lot about a little.

Read the full article here. Angela Duckworth also has a phenomenal book on the topic of grit that I highly recommend.

Muscle Growth Is Slow – Try This Instead

This post originally appeared on the 3D Muscle Journey blog in May 2017.

One of the most common detriments to physique and strength athletes is their impatience.

Everybody wants to be ten times more aesthetic and strong than they currently are, and they want it to have been achieved yesterday.

You might even have a very solid nutritional and training plan in place to ensure muscle growth over time, but still not look the way you want to look or lift the way you want to lift.

So what gives? Why do you feel like nothing is happening and you are spinning your wheels and wasting your time? Why aren’t you “there” yet?

In essence, if you’ve given your sport a good amount of time and effort, why hasn’t it rewarded you in return?

Well, I’d like to argue that your reward system might be a little messed up.— Read More…

Andrea & Friends 006 – Abdullah Zeinab

In this conversation, I’m talking to the wisest 23 year old I know, Abdullah Zeinab.

He’s a former 3DMJ athlete and a big YouTube personality, whose days consist of waking up at 2am, delivering food, and making endurance cycling documentaries.

Abdullah is a very dear friend of the entire 3DMJ crew, and he’s such a breathe of fresh air in a world filled with over planning, over thinking, and overly obsessing about how we’re perceived by other people.— Read More…

Andrea & Friends 002 – Ian McCarthy

Ian is the owner, coach, and content creator of Lifting For Life, LLC.

While I have met Ian in person many times before, I always left with some sense of mystery as to how his brain ticked.

Since first watching his videos back in 2012, I found him to be extremely fascinating and get super hung up on how he operates, so having him on this podcast for over 2 hours was a real treat for me.

Please enjoy our chat about youtube, family, anorexia, critical thinking, social media, and a whole whole lot more.

Here is the second installment of Andrea & Friends with Ian McCarthy. — Read More…

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